Ahrari et al. (2006); Egypt

Scale/Scope: 
2 large communities
Evaluation Design: 
Repeated cross-sectional – 519 women (344 intervention, 175 control)
Outcomes: 
Outcomes Measured: 
% of women who reported consumption of more food during pregnancy
Results: 
54.9% vs. 10.6%
P-values/CIs: 
Not clear in article
High Impact Practices: 
Increased energy and protein intake during pregnancy and lactation
Outcomes Measured: 
% of women who reported consumption of more meat during pregnancy
Results: 
57.1% vs. 4.2%
P-values/CIs: 
Not clear in article
High Impact Practices: 
Enhanced quality of diet during pregnancy and lactation
Outcomes Measured: 
% of women who reported consumption of more vegetables during pregnancy
Results: 
66.9% vs. 5.3%
P-values/CIs: 
Not clear in article
High Impact Practices: 
Enhanced quality of diet during pregnancy and lactation
Outcomes Measured: 
% of pregnant women who reported taking IFA
Results: 
97.5% vs. 80.6%
P-values/CIs: 
NS 9
High Impact Practices: 
Intake of micronutrient and iron supplements
Outcomes Measured: 
% of pregnant women who reported taking 7 or more IFA tablets per week
Results: 
86.2% vs. 0.0%
P-values/CIs: 
NS
High Impact Practices: 
Intake of micronutrient and iron supplements
Outcomes Measured: 
% of women who reported an increase in daytime rest during pregnancy
Results: 
64.1% vs. 11.7%
P-values/CIs: 
Not clear in article
High Impact Practices: 
Rest and work during pregnancy