Linking Agriculture and Nutrition

SPRING Participates in SUN Uganda Launch

Agriculture is fundamental to nutrition as it supplies food for all human beings. It is also a primary way people make a living in most developing countries. In collaboration with USAID and other global development partners, SPRING is building the evidence base around how nutritional outcomes may be strengthened through agricultural programming. Drawing on its team of agriculture, behavior change, and nutrition experts and the diverse programmatic and research experience of its partners, SPRING is working with USAID Missions to refine and apply a common framework for improving nutritional outcomes through agriculture. The SPRING team is documenting innovations and results, delivering technical assistance, and mobilizing stakeholders to improve the design, implementation and monitoring of Feed the Future activities. SPRING is also working directly with market-led value chain activities to translate planned improvements in food systems to support improved nutritional outcomes among Feed the Future target groups. Learn more about SPRING’s work by clicking on the links below.

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SPRING Promotes Nutrition-Sensitive Agriculture

Learn how we support and promote nutrition-sensitive agriculture with global evidence and guidance, design and monitoring tools, and lessons from field experience.

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News

Mar 2017
This International Women's Day, SPRING shows its appreciation for women around the world, honoring their achievements and recognizing the contributions they make to healthy families, communities, and...
Sarah Hogan at the SPRING booth.
Mar 2017
Victor Pinga and Sarah Hogan attended the INGENAES Global Symposium to share our nutrition-sensitive agriculture work.
Groundnut shellers
Mar 2017
SPRING is distributing nut shellers to communities in Northern Ghana as a demonstration of their ability to save labor for female groundnut and shea nut farmers.